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Allison G. S. Knox

Passionate about the issues affecting ambulances and disaster management, Allison focuses on Emergency Management and Emergency Medical Services policy. Allison has taught at the undergraduate level since 2010. Prior to teaching, she worked in a level-one trauma center emergency department and for a member of Congress in Washington, D.C. She holds four master’s degrees in Emergency Management, National Security Studies, International Relations, and History; a Graduate Certificate in Homeland Security; and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. Allison is an Emergency Medical Technician, Lifeguard, and Lifeguard Instructor, and is trained in Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue. She serves on the Board of Trustees for Pi Gamma Mu International Honor Society as Chancellor of the Southeast Region, Vice Chair of the Tactical Emergency Medical Support Committee with the International Public Safety Association, and serves as the Advocacy Coordinator of Virginia with the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. She is also a member of several committees including the Editorial Committee with APCO, the Rescue Task Force Committee with the International Public Safety Association, and the Advocacy Committee with the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. She also serves as Chair of the Leadership Development Program for the 2020 Pi Gamma Mu Triennial Convention. Allison has published several book reviews and continues to write about issues affecting ambulances, emergency management, and homeland security.

Innovation Sometimes Involves Returning to Old Practices

As a community changes, patient care and resource management for 911 calls will need to adapt; that may involve readapting an old idea for a new innovation.

Does Emergency Management Need Recovery and Rebuilding Offices?

Dedicated disaster recovery and rebuilding offices would bring all emergency management players together to create collaboration between agencies.

Dorian Aftermath Illuminates Bahamas’ Immigration Issues

Hurricane Dorian brought to life numerous social issues in the vulnerable areas of the Bahamas. Immigration was one of those issues.

Can We Eliminate Surprise Billing for Emergency Services?

It is strategically important for emergency managers and other stakeholders to carefully follow discussions about surprise billing.

Typhoon Hagibis: Another Case of Broken Levees?

Typhoon Hagibis left about 50 persons dead in Japan. The rains from the typhoon – one of the worst to strike Japan in decades – broke 10 levees that flooded a number of communities.

Social Workers Joining Law Enforcement to Improve Service

Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) has emerged, allowing EMS to handle serious, high-risk emergencies.

Dorian Exposed Our Vulnerability to Category 5 Hurricanes

Ultimately, Hurricane Dorian is an example of vulnerability as a concept in the emergency management discipline.

Dorian Shows Need for Proper Disaster Resource Management

Hurricane Dorian serves as a prime example of the criticality of proper resource management before and during the initial recovery phases of a disaster.

Montana Study May Resolve EMS Volunteer Recruiting Issues

Across the country, EMS agencies have reported problems with recruitment and retention of volunteers. Montana has a plan to help with the issue.

Rephrasing Mass Shooting Events to Mass Casualty Incidents

The term “active shooter” is changing in homeland security and emergency management organizations because mass casualty situations are changing.