Home Emergency Management News Keeping Up with the Times: Modernizing Emergency Management Systems

Keeping Up with the Times: Modernizing Emergency Management Systems

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By Allison G. S. Knox
Contributor, EDM Digest

Warning the public of an impending dangerous weather event is one of the most important elements of emergency management. By alerting the public with a reliable warning system, emergency managers can limit some of the risks associated with emergencies.

Warning systems have long had a positive effect on emergency management and crises. For example, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has a tsunami warning system in the Pacific.

Similarly, Emergency Management magazine reports that Longmont, Colorado, replaced its trouble-plagued tornado warning system with a new system that includes applications like Facebook and Twitter. While sirens had worked well in the past for Longmont, according to USA Today, the system utilizing smartphones’ GPS technology quickly transmits emergency messages to residents in the storm zone.

Emergency Managers Must Seek New Ways to Communicate with Local Residents

As times change and technological systems become antiquated, emergency managers and others in public safety fields must figure out how to reach their audience.

For example, the phone book has become as archaic and as rare as the phone booth. People usually now use Google or other search engine apps on their smartphones to get information. So it would not be wise to include emergency management preparation advice in a phone book any more.

It is important for emergency managers to consider changing times and methods when designing system updates.

Allison G. S. Knox Passionate about the issues affecting ambulances and disaster management, Allison focuses on Emergency Management and Emergency Medical Services policy. Allison has taught at the undergraduate level since 2010. Prior to teaching, she worked in a level-one trauma center emergency department and for a member of Congress in Washington, D.C. She holds four master’s degrees in Emergency Management, National Security Studies, International Relations, and History; a Graduate Certificate in Homeland Security; and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science. Allison is an Emergency Medical Technician, Lifeguard, and Lifeguard Instructor, and is trained in Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue. She serves on the Board of Trustees for Pi Gamma Mu International Honor Society as Chancellor of the Southeast Region, Vice Chair of the Tactical Emergency Medical Support Committee with the International Public Safety Association, and serves as the Advocacy Coordinator of Virginia with the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. She is also a member of several committees including the Editorial Committee with APCO, the Rescue Task Force Committee with the International Public Safety Association, and the Advocacy Committee with the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. She also serves as Chair of the Leadership Development Program for the 2020 Pi Gamma Mu Triennial Convention. Allison has published several book reviews and continues to write about issues affecting ambulances, emergency management, and homeland security.